Samstag, 31. Januar 2015

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 42
- Im Elysium -

"Auch ich hab", sprach Pallas Athene,
"Noch ein nettes Froschgedicht."
Und sie ergänzte "notabene,
Das kennt ihr sicherlich noch nicht."

Und dann hat sie konzentriert
Den alten Poem gleich rezitiert.


The Frog and the Bird
- Vera Hessey -


By a quiet little stream on an old mossy log;
Looking very forlorn, sat a little green frog;
He'd a sleek speckled back, and two bright yellow eyes,
And when dining, selected the choicest of flies.


The sun was so hot, he scarce opened his eyes,
Far too lazy to stir, let alone watch for flies,
He was nodding, and nodding, and almost asleep,
When a voice in the branches chirped, 'Froggie, cheep, cheep!'

'You'd better take care,' piped the bird to the frog,
'In the water you'll be if you fall off that log.
Can't you see that the streamlet is up to the brim?'
Croaked the froggie, 'What odds! You forget I can swim!'


Then the froggie looked up at the bird perched so high
On a bough that to him seemed to reach to the sky;
So he croaked to the bird: 'If you fall you will die!'
Chirped the birdie, 'What odds! You forget I can fly!

Quelle: Gerald Donaldson S. 43

***

wird fortgesetzt

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 41
- Im Elysium -

"Lasst von des Frosches Omina"
Grinste darauf Latona,
"Uns zu den alten braven frommen
Lillooet - Indianern kommen.
Von denen las im Vollmondlichte
Ich kürzlich folgende Geschichte."


The Man in the Moon
- A Legend of the Lillooet
Tribe of North America -

The three Frog sisters had a house in a swamp, where they lived together. Not very far away lived a number of people in another house. Among them were Snake and Beaver, who were friends.

They were well-grown lads, and wished to marry the Frog girls.

One night Snake went to Frog's house, and, crawling up to one of the sisters, put his hand on her face. She awoke, and asked him who he was. Learning that he was Snake, she said she would not marry him, and told him to leave at once. She called him hard names, such as, "slimy-fellow," "small-eyes," etc. Snake returned, and told his friend of his failure.

Next night Beaver went to try, and, crawling up to one of the sisters, he put his hand on her face. She awoke, and, finding out who he was, she told him to be gone. She called him names, such as, "short-legs," "big-belly," "big- buttocks." Beaver felt hurt, and, going home, began to cry. His father asked him what the matter was, and the boy told him. He said, "That is nothing. Don't cry! It will rain too much." But young Beaver said, "I will cry."

As he continued to cry, much rain fell, and soon the swamp where the Frogs lived was flooded. Their house was under the water, which covered the tops of the tall swamp-grass. The Frogs got cold, and went to Beaver's house, and said to him, "We wish to marry your sons." But old Beaver said, "No! You called us hard names."

The water was now running in a regular stream. So the Frogs swam away downstream until they reached a whirlpool, which sucked them in, and they descended to the house of the Moon. The latter invited them to warm themselves at the fire; but they said, "No. We do not wish to sit by the fire. We wish to sit there," pointing at him.

He said, "Here?" at the same time pointing at his feet. They said, "No, not there." Then he pointed to one part of his body after another, until he reached his brow. When he said, "Will you sit here?" they all cried out, "Yes," and jumped on his face, thus spoiling his beauty. The Frog's sisters may be seen on the moon's face at the present day.



***

wird fortgesetzt


Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 40
- Im Elysium -

Nach der Göttin Thetis dann
War Aphrodite wieder dran.

"Ich will euch von den grünen Gnomen,
Die wir ja nun recht gut kennen,
Und liebevoll hier Fröschlein nennen,
Kundtun," sprach sie, "was die den Leuten
Als gutes oder schlechtes Omen
Dort unten auf der Welt bedeuten."

Und dann fügte sie spontan
Die ihr bekannten Omen an.

Frog Omens




***
wird fortgesetzt

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 39
- Im Elysium -


 Als die Mainu- Frosch-Legende
Die eben Hera hat erzählt,
Just gerade war zu Ende,
Sprach Thetis zu den Götterdamen
"Ich hab für euch was ausgewählt
Das in Theocritus Namen
Man seit dem Altertum berichtet.

Von Hirten dereinst wohl gedichtet
Ist die Story sicher bald
Zweitausendfünfhundert Jahre alt.

Beim Cora-Stamm in Mexiko
Im Nayarit und anderswo
Erzählt man heute noch davon
Was Theokrit wusst' damals schon."


The Merry Frogs


***

wird fortgesetzt

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 38
- Im Elysium -

Nach Hebe, Hera, das war klar,
Wieder an der Reihe war.
Sie erzählte von Mainu
Eine asiatische Legende,
In welcher Mainu ein Froschfilou,
Der Held der Story blieb am Ende.


Mainu the Frog

oder

The Son of Kim-ana-u-eze and
the Daughter of Sun and Moon
(Ovimbundu)









The Son of Kim-ana-u-eze and
the Daughter of Sun and Moon



I often tell of Kim-ana-u-eze, who begat a male child. The child grew up, and he came to the age of marrying. His father said, "Marry."
He said, "I will not marry a woman of the earth."
His father asked, "Then whom will you marry?"
He answered, "I! If it must be, I shall marry the daughter of Lord Sun and Lady Moon."
But the people asked, "Who can go to the sky where the daughter of Lord Sun and Lady Moon lives?"
He simply said, "I, indeed; I want her. If it is anyone on earth, I will not marry her."
Thereupon he wrote a letter of marriage and gave it to Deer. But Deer said, "I cannot go to the sky."
Then he gave it to Antelope. Antelope also said, "I cannot go to the sky."
He gave the letter to Hawk. Hawk, too, said, "I cannot go to the sky."
He gave it to Vulture, but Vulture also said, "I can go halfway to the sky; however, all the way I cannot go."
Finally the young man said, "How shall I do it?" He put his letter in his box and was quiet.
The people of Lord Sun and Lady Moon used to come to get water on earth, and one day Frog came and sought out the son of Kim-ana-u-eze and spoke to him.
"Young master," he said, "give me the letter that I may take it."
The young master, however, said, "Begone! If people of life, who have wings, gave it up, how can you say, "I will go there? How can you get there?"
Frog said, "Young master, I am equal to it."
So Kim-ana-u-eze gave Frog the letter, saying, "If you cannot get there and you return with it, I shall give you a thrashing."
Frog started out and went to the well where the people of Lord Sun and Lady Moon were wont to come to get water. He put the letter in his mouth and got into the well and kept very still. In a little while, the people of Lord Sun and Lady Moon came to get water. They put a jug into the well, and Frog got into the jug. After they got the water, they lifted it up, not knowing that Frog had entered the jug. They arrived in the sky, set down the jug in its place, and departed.
Then Frog got out of the jug. In the room where they kept the jugs of water, there was also a table. Frog spat out the letter and placed it on top of the table. Then he hid in the corner of the room.
After a while, Lord Sun himself came into the room where the water was; he looked at the table and saw the letter on it. He took it and asked his people, "Whence comes this letter?"
They answered, "Lord we do not know." He opened it and read it. It ran thus: "I, the son of Na Kim-ana-u-eze Kia-Tumb Ndala, a man of earth, want to marry the daughter of Lord Sun and Lady Moon." Lord Sun thought to him self in his heart: "Na Kim-ana- u-eze lives on earth; I am a man who lives in the sky. He who came with the letter, who is he?" He put the letter away into his box and said nothing.
When Lord Sun finished reading the letter, Frog got into the jug again. After the water had been emptied out of the jugs, the water girls lifted them and went down to earth. They again arrived at the well and put the jugs in the water. Frog then got out and went under the water and hid himself. After the girls had finished the filling of the jugs they left.
The Frog came out of the water and went to his village. There he kept quiet and said nothing. When many days had passed, the son of Kim-ana-u-eze asked Frog, "O fellow, where did you take the letter, and how?"
Frog answered, "Master, I delivered the letter, but they have not yet returned an answer."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "O man, you are telling a lie; you did not go there."
Frog said, "Master, that same place where I went, that you shall see."
After six days, the son of Kim-ana-u-eze again wrote a letter to ask about the former letter, saying: "I wrote to you, Lord Sun and Lady Moon. My letter was delivered but you returned no answer whatsoever to me, saying neither "We accept you" nor "We refuse you. Having finished his letter, he sealed it. Then he called Frog and gave it to him. Frog started and soon arrived at the well. He took the letter into his mouth, got into the water, and squatted on the bottom of the well."
After a while, the water carriers came down and arrived at the well. They put the jugs into the water, and Frog got into a jug. When they had finished filling them, they lifted them up. They went up to the sky by means of a cobweb which Spider had woven. Soon they arrived there, and entered a house. There they set down the jugs and departed. Frog came out of the jug, spat out the letter, and laid it on the table. Then he hid in the corner.
After a while, Lord Sun passed through the room where the water was. He looked at the table and saw the letter on it. He opened and read it. The letter said: "I, son of Na Kim-ana-u-eze Kia-Tumb" Ndala, I ask you, Lord Sun, about my letter that went before. You did not return me an answer at all."
Lord Sun said, "Girls, you who always go to fetch water, are you carrying letters?"
The girls said, "We, master? "
Then doubt possessed Lord Sun. He laid the letter in the box and wrote to the son of Kim-ana-u-eze, saying: "You who are sending me letters about marrying my daughter: I agree, on condition that you in person, the man, come with your first present, so that I may know you." When he finished writing, he folded the letter and laid it on the table and went away. Frog now came out of the corner and took the letter. He put it in his mouth and entered the jug. Then he remained very quiet.
After a while, the water was emptied from the jugs, and the girls came and lifted them up. Then they went to the cord of Spider and descended to earth. They arrived at the well and put the jugs into the water. Frog got out of the jug and went to the bottom of the well. When the girls had completed the filling of the jugs, they returned to the sky. Frog then left the well and soon arrived in his village. He kept very quiet.
When evening came, he said, "Now I will take the letter." He spat it out and arrived at the house of the son of Kim-ana- u-eze. He knocked at the door, and the son of Kim-ana-u-eze asked, "Who is it?"
Frog answered, "I, Mainu, the frog."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze got up from his bed where he was reclining and said, "Come in."
So Frog went in and delivered the letter. Then he departed. The son of Kim-ana-u-eze opened the letter and read it. What Lord Sun announced pleased him. He said to himself: "Why, it was the truth Frog told me when he said, "You shall see where I went."  Then he went to sleep.
The next morning, he took forty macutas (coins) and wrote a letter, saying: "You, Lord Sun and Moon, here is the first present, I remain on earth to seek for the wooing present. You up there, you tell me the amount of the wooing present." He finished the letter and called Frog. When he came, he gave him the letter and the money, saying, "Take this."
So Frog started. Soon he arrived at the well. He went to the bottom of the well and remained very quiet. After a while, the girls came down and put the jugs in the water, and Frog entered one of them. When the girls had finished filling them, they took them up. Again they went up to the sky by means of a cobweb. Soon they arrived in the room for the water. They set down the jugs and went away.
Then Frog got out of the jug and put the letter on the table, together with the money. Then he hid in the corner. Some time later, Lord Sun came into the room and found the letter on the table. He took it with the money and read the letter. Then he told his wife the news that had come from the prospective son-in-law. His wife assented.
Lord Sun said, "Who is coming with these letters? I do not know. How shall his food be cooked?"
His wife, however, answered, "No matter, we shall cook it anyhow and put it on the table where the letters have been found."
Lord Sun replied, "Very well."
So they killed a mother hen and cooked it. When evening came, they cooked mush. They set these eatables on the table and shut the door. Frog came to the table and ate the victuals. Then he went to the corner and kept quiet.
Lord Sun now wrote another letter saying: "You, son-in-law of mine, the first present which you have sent me I have received. For the amount of the wooing present, you shall give me a sack of money." When he had finished the letter, he laid it on the table and left the room. Then Frog came out of the corner and took the letter. Shortly afterward, he entered the jug and went to sleep.
In the morning the girls took the jugs and went down to the earth. They arrived at the well and put the jugs into the water. Frog then got out of the jug. When the girls had finished filling the jugs, they again went up to the sky.
Frog now got out of the water and soon arrived at his village. He entered his own house but waited quietly until sundown. When evening had come, he said, "Now I will take the letter." He started out and soon arrived at the house of the son of Kim-ana- u-eze. He knocked at the door and the son of Kim-ana-u-eze asked, "Who is it?"
Then Frog answered, "I, Mainu, the frog."
"Come in," he replied.
Frog went in; he gave him the letter and departed. The son of Kim-ana-u-eze opened the letter, read it, and then put it aside.
Six days passed; then he was ready with the sack of money. He called Frog, and when Frog had come, the son of Kim-ana-u-eze wrote the following letter: "You, my parents-in-law, the wooing present is enclosed. Soon I myself, I shall find a day to bring my wife home." He gave the letter to Frog, together with the money.
Frog then started and soon arrived at the well. Again he went in under the water and hid. After a while, the water carriers came down and arrived at the well. They put the jugs, as usual, in the water; Frog, as usual, entered a jug. When they had finished filling the jugs, they took them up, going up by means of Spider cobweb. Soon they arrived in the sky. There they set down the jugs in the regular room and departed. Frog then got out of the jug and laid the letter down on the table, together with the money. Then he went into a corner and hid.
Soon Lord Sun came into the room and found the letter and the money. He took both and showed the money to his wife, Lady Moon.
Lady Moon thereupon said, "It is good."
Then they took a young hog and killed it. When they had cooked the food, they set it down on the table and shut the door. Frog came in then and ate it. When he had finished, he entered the jug and went to sleep.
The next morning the water carriers took the jugs and again went down to earth. They soon arrived at the well and dipped the jugs in the water. Frog then got out of the jug and hid. When they had finished filling the jugs, they again returned to the sky. Then Frog left the well and soon arrived at his village. He entered his house and went to sleep.
The next morning, he said to the son of Kim-ana-u-eze, "Young master, I gave them the wooing present, and they accepted it. They cooked me a young hog, and I ate it. Now, you yourself shall choose the day to fetch the bride home."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "Very well." Then twelve days elapsed.
Now the son of Kim-ana-u-eze spoke to Frog: "I need people to fetch the bride for me, but I cannot find them. All those to whom I speak say, "We cannot go to the sky. Now, what shall I do, Frog?"
Frog said, "My young master, be at ease; I shall find a way to go and bring her home for you."
But the son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "You cannot do that. You could indeed carry the letters, but bring the bride home that you are unable to do."
But Frog again said, "Young master, be at ease; be not troubled for naught. I indeed will be able to go and bring her home. Do not despise me."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "Well, I will try you."
Then he took some victuals and gave them to Frog.
Frog thereupon started. Soon he arrived at the well. Again he got into the well and hid. After a while, the water carriers came down and arrived at the well. They dipped the jugs in the water. Frog entered one of them. When they had filled them, they went back. Arriving at the proper room, they set down the jugs and departed. Then Frog got out of the jug and hid in a corner. When the sun had set and it was evening, Frog left the room of the water jugs and went to seek the room where the daughter of Lord Sun slept. He found it and saw her asleep there. First he took out one of her eyes and then the other. These he tied up in a handkerchief and went back to the room where the jugs were. He hid in a corner and slept.
In the morning, all the people got up, but not the daughter of Lord Sun. So they asked her, "Why do you not get up?"
And she answered, "My eyes are closed; I cannot see."
Her father and mother said, "What may be the cause of this? Yesterday she did not complain."
So Lord Sun called for two messengers and said to them, "Go to Ngombo to divine about my child who is sick, whose eyes are sick." They started immediately and soon arrived at the Ngombo-manâ." They gave him presents and Ngombo took our his paraphernalia. Now the people who came did not let him know anything about the disease; they simply said, "We have come to be divined."
Ngombo looked into his paraphernalia and said, "Disease has brought you. The one who is sick is a woman. The sickness that ails her concerns her eyes. You have come, being sent, you have not come of your own will. I have spoken."
The people said, "True. Now tell us what caused the ailment." Ngombo looked again, and said, "She, the woman who is sick, is not yet married. She is only chosen. Her master, who bespoke her, has sent a spell saying, "My wife, let her come; if she does not come, she shall die. You, who came to divine, go, bring her to her husband that she may escape death. I have spoken."
The messengers agreed and got up. They went to Lord Sun and reported to him the words of Ngombo.
Lord Sun said, "All right. Let us sleep. Tomorrow they shall take her down to earth."
Frog, being in his corner, heard all that they were saying. Then all slept.
The next morning, Frog got into the jug. Again the water carriers came. Again they took up the jugs. Then they descended to the earth and soon arrived at the well. They put the jugs in the water, and Frog came out of one of them. He hid under the well. When the jugs were filled, the water carriers went up to the sky.
Then Lord Sun told Spider, "Weave a large cobweb, down to earth, for this is the day when my daughter will be taken down to the earth." Spider wove and finished the web. Thus time passed.
Frog now got out of the well and went to his village. He found the son of Kim-ana-u-eze and said to him, "O young master! Thy bride, today she comes."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "Begone, man, you are a liar."
Frog answered, "Master, this is the truth itself. This evening I will bring her to you."
Frog then returned to the well and got into the water and was silent.
Now the sun had set, and the daughter of Lord Sun was taken down to the earth. They left her at the well and then went back.
Frog now got out of the well and spoke to the young woman, saying, "I myself will be your guide. Let us go immediately so that I can bring you to your master." Then Frog returned her eyes to her and they started. Soon they entered the house of the son of Kim-ana-u-eze. Frog exclaimed:
"O young master! Your bride is here."
The son of Kim-ana-u-eze said, "Welcome, Mainu the frog."
And so the son of Kim-ana-u-eze married the daughter of Lord Sun and Lady Moon, and they lived on.

***

wird fortgesetzt


Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 37
- Im Elysium -

Nach Thetis durfte Hebe nun
Was sie liebend gern tat, tun.
Sie trug den andern mit Humor,
Als ob ihr eignes Werk es sei.
'Nen Poem aus ihrer Schulzeit vor.

Und sie lachte froh dabei.
Schließlich gab sie zu am Schluss,
Listig und arg hintertrieben:
"Ich bin jener Anonymus
Der das hat geschrieben!"

Frogs at School




***
wird fortgesetzt

Freitag, 30. Januar 2015

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 36
- Im Elysium -

Nach Helena war Thetis dran.
Sie erzählte ganz spontan,
Um die andern zu beglücken,
Was sie im Panchatantra fand,
Wo es aufgeschrieben stand,
Von Froschritt auf dem Schlangenrücken.


The Frogs that Rode Snakeback
The Panchatantra, circa 200 BC



Bear even foes upon your back;
When fortune clogs
Your path, endure. The great black snake
Slew many frogs.


There was once an elderly black snake in a certain spot, and his name was Slow-Poison. He considered the situation from this point of view: "How in the world can I get along without overtaxing my energies?" Then he went to a pond containing many frogs, and behaved as if very dejected.

As he waited thus, a frog came to the edge of the water and asked: "Uncle, why don't you bustle about today for food as usual ?"

"My dear friend," said Slow-Poison, "I am afflicted. Why should I wish for food? For this evening, as I was bustling about for food, I saw a frog and made ready to catch him. But he saw me and, fearing death, he escaped among some Brahmans intent upon holy recitation, nor did I perceive which way he went. But in the water at the edge of the pond was the great toe of a Brahman boy, and stupidly deceived by its resemblance to a frog, I bit it, and the boy died immediately. Then the sorrowing father cursed me in these terms: 'Monster! Since you bit my harmless son, you shall for this sin become a vehicle for frogs, and shall subsist on whatever they choose to allow you.' Consequently, I have come here to serve as your vehicle."
Now the frog reported this to all the others. And every last one of them, in extreme delight, went and reported to the frog-king, whose name was Water- Foot. He in turn, accompanied by his counselors, rose hurriedly from the pond for he thought it an extraordinary occurrence and climbed upon Slow- Poison's hood. The others also, in order of age, climbed on his back. Yet others, finding no vacant spot, hopped along behind the snake. Now Slow- Poison, with an eye to making his living, showed them fancy turns in great variety. And Water-Foot, enjoying contact with his body, said to him:
I'd rather ride Slow-Poison than
The finest horse I've seen,
Or elephant, or chariot,
Or man-borne palanquin.

The next day, Slow-Poison was wily enough to move very slowly. So Water-Foot said: "My dear Slow-Poison, why don't you carry us nicely, as you did before?"
And Slow-Poison said: "O King, I have no carrying power today because of lack of food." "My dear fellow," said the king, "eat the plebeian frogs."

When Slow-Poison heard this, he quivered with joy in every member and made haste to say: "Why, that is a part of the curse laid on me by the Brahman. For that reason I am greatly pleased at your command." So he ate frogs uninterruptedly, and in a very few days he grew strong. And with delight and inner laughter he said:
The trick was good. All sorts of frogs
Within my power have passed.
The only question that remains,
Is: How long will they last?


Water-Foot, for his part, was befooled by Slow-Poison's plausibility's, and did not notice a thing.
At this moment another black snake, a tremendous fellow, arrived on the scene. And being amazed at the sight of Slow-Poison used as a vehicle by frogs, he said: "Partner, they are our natural food, yet they use you as a vehicle. This is repellent." And Slow-Poison said:
I know I should not carry frogs;
I have it well in mind;
But I am marking time, as did
The Brahman butter-blind.

"How was that?" asked the snake. And Slow-Poison told the story of
THE BUTTER-BLINDED BRAHMAN



Video


***
wird fortgesetzt

Im Elysium

Machwerk R.W. Aristoquakes
Teil 31 - 35
- Im Elysium -

Von einem Seefrosch und zwei Fischen,
Die andern staunten all hellwach,
Berichtete Helena danach
Um eine Geschichte aufzufrischen
Die im Panchatantra aufgeschrieben,
Erhalten war so lang geblieben.

Der Frosch, nicht grade hochbegabt,
Ist entkommen der Gefahr.
Weil er 'nen siebten Sinn gehabt
Und nicht überheblich war,
Konnt' im Gegensatz er zu den Fischen
Dem sichern Tod entwischen.


The Frog and the Two Fish
The Panchatantra, circa 200 BC

Two large fishes, Sahasrabuddhi and Satabuddhi lived in a big pond, and were close friends with a frog called Ekabuddhi. They spent a lot of time together on the bank of the pond.

One evening, as they were assembled on the bank of the pond, they saw a few fishermen approaching. They had nets and big baskets with them, which were full of fishes that they had caught.

While passing by the pond, they noticed that the pond was full of fishes. One of them said to the others, "Let us come here tomorrow morning. This pond is not very deep, and is full of fishes. We have never caught fishes in this pond."
 

They agreed to return the very next morning, and continued their journey homewards.

The frog was depressed on hearing the fishermen and said, "O Friends, we should decide what to do, whether to run or hide. These fishermen will return tomorrow morning!"

The fishes however did not care much. The first fish said, "O Friend, It is just mere talks of few passing fishermen. Don't worry, for they will not come. And, even if they do, I know innumerable tricky water movements.
I shall save myself and my family with ease."
 

The second fish joined, "I am as talented in tricky water movements as you! I will be able to save myself and my family too. I support your stand, for I will not abandon the home of our ancestors for the sake of some mere talk of few passing fishermen."

But the frog was not convinced, he said, "My friends, my only talent is that I can foresee danger. You may stay, but I will leave with my family to some other pond before morning."

The very next morning, the fishermen came and cast their nets all over the pond. They had a big haul, and caught many fishes, frogs, tortoises and crabs.
 

Sahasrabuddhi and Satabuddhi tried hard to escape, but none of their tricks worked. They were caught, and when the fishermen dragged their net on the bank of the pond they were already dead.

Being the largest of the fishes the fishermen caught, they proudly displayed Sahasrabuddhi and Satabuddhi, and carried them separately as they started homewards.
 
Meanwhile, the frog, Ekabuddhi, had already found a well for shelter. Being worried and anxious, he came to the surface. But as he saw the fishermen departing with his friends, he became sad.

He told his wife, "They were very talented, but lacked the only talent that was most important. As for me, I may have only one talent, but I swim happily with my family!"


The wise indeed say:
At the first hint of danger, act quickly to save yourself.



Der Frosch und die beiden Fische


 



 ***

wird fortgesetzt


Zur Einstimmung

Bei dem hier unter dem Pseudonym R.W. Aristoquakes virtuell zur Veröffentlichung gebrachten, mehr als fünfzigtausend Doppelverszeilen umfassenden und mit über 10.000 Zeichnungen versehenen Epos handelt es sich um die umfangreichste Nacherzählung des Homer zugeschriebenen Kriegsberichtes, die jemals niedergeschrieben wurde und nach Auffassung des Autors, um das wichtigste literarische Werk der Neuzeit überhaupt.

Unter dem oben abgedruckten Titel veröffentlicht der noch unbekannte Schriftsteller an dieser Stelle in den nächsten fünf Jahren sein als Fortsetzungeerzählung entstandenes Mammutmachwerk über den antiken Tierkrieg und dessen Folgen für die Menschheit.

Das über zweitausend Jahre alte homerische Epillion, das im Original nur etwa 300 Verszeilen umfasst, wurde von R.W. A., der zehn Jahre lang daran gearbeitet hat, zu einem Mammutwerk aufgebläht, das die Batrachomyomachia mit der Ilias und der Bibel verbindet.

Diese Verknüpfung der drei wichtigsten Werke der abendländischen Literatur, die in etwa zur gleichen Zeit entstanden sind, dient dem Autor dazu, seine religionsgeschichtliche These zu untermauern, in der er den Frosch als Ursprungsgottheit darstellt und behauptet, dass die Götter der Neuzeit nichts anderes sind als die konsequente Weiterentwicklung der ägyptischen Froschgötter.